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Video Above: US Sends Heavy Equipment to Ukraine to Battle Russia

By Kris Osborn - President & Editor-In-Chief, Warrior Maven

Javelin anti-tank missiles, Stinger anti-aircraft missiles, artillery, drones, armored vehicles and ammunition are all taking a toll on Russian forces which have struggled to accomplish any of their apparent objectives as of yet.

The Pentagon says the major weapons systems being provided are having a substantial impact upon the war, citing the many objectives Russian forces have been unable to accomplish.

Members of Ukraine's armed forces stand in front of various foreign-supplied missile launchers, including a pedestal-mounted twin Stinger launcher, at far left, and a Javelin anti-tank missile system, at right closest to the camera.

Members of Ukraine's armed forces stand in front of various foreign-supplied missile launchers, including a pedestal-mounted twin Stinger launcher, at far left, and a Javelin anti-tank missile system, at right closest to the camera.

“I would just offer you a look. We're at two months into this war. And Mr. Putin didn't take Kyiv. He didn't take Chernihiv. He hasn't taken Odessa. And instead of moving on three, why geographically separated lines of axes, now he's concentrating all his firing and forces in the East and in the South,” Pentagon spokesman John Kirby told reporters, according to a transcript.

The initial round of weapons, such as shoulder-fired anti-tank weapons and anti-aircraft systems demonstrated a near immediate impact, as Ukrainian forces were able to conduct hit-and-run types of asymmetrcal ambushes on Russian armored vehicle convoys. Likely using the terrain and buildings to their advantage, Ukrainian fighters have also appeared to have success destroying Russian helicopters with shoulder-fired Stinger missiles. Foreign drones have also had an impact, along with small arms.

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US 155mm Howitzer Artillery Systems and Cheetahs

However, more recently there has been a massive influx of heavier systems, perhaps quite timely as Russia consolidates to the East and attacks Donbas. This is an area where heavier weapons might be of even greater value to the Ukrainians, who now have US 155mm Howitzer artillery systems, advanced air defenses, armored personnel carriers and German tank-like anti-aircraft guns called Cheetahs, among other things.

Video Above: The War in Donbas, Ukraine with Russia

These heavier systems could be of great significance given that Russia is reported to have repositioned, resupplied and re-armed much of its remaining heavy force for the purpose of launching a massive offensive into Donbas. Having artillery, Ukrainians will be able to launch suppressive fire onto approaching Russian troops, allowing them to maneuver. Artillery will also enable them to attack troop concentrations, convoys and static missile launchers from more than 30km away, something they have not had thus far.

Armored personnel carriers will allow them to quickly reinforce dismounted units in urban combat and add speed and concentrated power into close quarter combat. The Pentagon’s list of equipment also includes counter mortar and counter artillery radar systems which they have likely needed badly given the shelling and rocket attacks into civilian areas. 

These kinds of radar, working in tandem with drones and other supportive surveillance technologies, can help identify the launch points of many of Russia’s inbound ballistic missiles. Finding and destroying those launcher could prove pivotal in this war as Russia has based its attack strategy upon indiscriminate bombing and destruction of civilian areas.

“He has achieved none of his strategic objectives. So, I think that's proof right there that the kinds of systems that are being provided to Ukraine have had an effect on their self-defense needs,” Kirby said.

Kris Osborn is the President of Warrior Maven - Center for Military Modernization and the Defense Editor for the National Interest. Osborn previously served at the Pentagon as a Highly Qualified Expert with the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army—Acquisition, Logistics & Technology. Osborn has also worked as an anchor and on-air military specialist at national TV networks. He has appeared as a guest military expert on Fox News, MSNBC, The Military Channel, and The History Channel. He also has a Masters Degree in Comparative Literature from Columbia University.

Kris Osborn, Warrior Maven President

Kris Osborn - Warrior Maven President - Center for Military Modernization